Change at Manorville or Eastport: The History of the Long Island Rail Road’s Manorville-Eastport Spur

Looking towards Moriches Bay, Our Lady of the Island (October 10, 2014)
Looking towards Moriches Bay, Our Lady of the Island (October 10, 2014)

While the Long Island Rail Road (LIRR) runs primarily east to west, there was a north to south link within the Pine Barrens of Suffolk County.  Abandoned long ago, the five-mile long track linked the Main Line at Manorville with the southern route at Eastport.  Frequent connecting service was available as well as roundtrips between the North and South Fork.  The following is a look at former LIRR service in two communities within the towns of Brookhaven and Southampton.  Manorville is the last remaining natural wonders of Long Island and Eastport, with its historic past, lies along picturesque Moriches Bay.

Manorville

The area of what is now Manorville in the town of Brookhaven was part of the large tract of land known as the Manor of St. George.  Granted to William (Tangier) Smith in a 1693 royal patent, it remained in the Smith family until it was sold to a group of colonists from Southold in 1721.  During the Revolution, a tiny valley left by a receding glacier served as a hiding place for American Patriots.  Consequently, the area was named Punk’s Hole after a Captain Punk reportedly used it as hiding place for his band of men.  The hole still remains about a thousand feet south of Hot Water Road, just east of the intersection at Halsey Manor Road.[1]

Due to the swamps and small streams in the area, present-day Manorville was at one time called Brookfield.  In fact there is a large swamp called, by the Indian name, Wampmissic.[2]  The etymology of the current name begins with the arrival of the LIRR in 1844.  The railroad added a station stop in the hamlet and called it St. George’s Manor.  However, the station agent, Seth Raynor detested the name because of its indirect reference to the English monarchy.  Purportedly, he painted over the station sign leaving only the name Manor.  A short time later a United States Post Office was opened in the community and utilized the name Manorville.[3]

With the railroad as both a passenger and freight carrier, Manorville was harvested for its cordwood to be used as locomotive fuel.  As they waited for engines to be serviced, passengers patronized both the Little Delmonico and Maples eating establishments.  In addition to cordwood and vegetables, the cranberry was also prevalent at the freight station.   Massachusetts entrepreneur George W. Davis converted a portion of North Manorville into cranberry bogs and shipped large quantities of the crop to New York under the name Blue Diamond.[4]

Manorville developed slowly compared to Suffolk County communities on the North and South Shores.  By the close of the nineteenth century, there were only five hundred inhabitants scattered over an area three to four square miles.  The center of the town only featured the station, a hotel, a few stores and shops, and a church.[5]  Progress of any significance occurred in the later part of the twentieth century.  In the first decade of the twentieth-first century, the Manorville Towne Center opened and the Manorville Chamber of Commerce was founded.  Much of the development is concentrated south of the Long Island Expressway while the area to the north is mainly a forest.  Indeed, Manorville’s landscape still comprises farm stands and sod farms.  There are also nature trails, golf courses, and the popular Long Island Game Farm.[6]

In south Manorville is the Roman Catholic sanctuary of prayer known as the Shrine of Our Lady of the Island.  Operated by the Montfort Missionaries, which was founded by St. Louis Marie de Montfort, the shrine has welcomed pilgrims for over forty years.  The first seventy-acres of land in northern Eastport were donated in 1953 by the Vigliotta family.  It was followed by a gift from the Harrison family of East Moriches in 1957, which includes the “Rock” and land overlooking Moriches Bay.  In 1975, an eighteen-foot statue of Mary and the Christ child was placed atop the “Rock.”  The outdoor Stations of the Cross were added along a quarter-mile wooden path in 1981.  The Pieta, set on a knoll, was constructed in 1985.[7] 

Mary and Child atop the Rock, Our Lady of the Island (October 10, 2014)
Mary and Child atop the Rock, Our Lady of the Island (October 10, 2014)
Pieta, Our Lady of the Island (October 10, 2014)
Pieta, Our Lady of the Island (October 10, 2014)
Rosary Garden, Our Lady of the Island (October 10, 2014)
Rosary Garden, Our Lady of the Island (October 10, 2014)

Pine Barrens

Manorville is the center of Long Island’s central Pine Barrens region.  The barrens are a vast tract of pine-covered land in parts of the towns of Riverhead, Brookhaven, and Southampton.  It is the outer crust of the island’s water supply for the twenty-first century, an estimated three trillion gallons under sandy soil.  It received its name because farmers for centuries spurned the dry soil and poor lumber of the land they called “barren.”  Luckily the economic downturn of the 1970s and 1980s limited development in the area and allowed for conservation.  The foresight of planners, activists, business people, voters and politicians saved what is referred to as Long Island’s last wilderness.[8]

Pine Barrens, Manorville (August 3, 2014)
Pine Barrens, Manorville (August 3, 2014)

While conservation reached public awareness in the 1980s, the drive began in the 1960s when Suffolk County bought property along the Peconic River.   A man named John Turner upon hiking in the mid-1970s decided to start the Long Island Pine Barrens Society.  He felt preservation was necessary since almost all the land was in the hands of developers.  Hence, pressure from environmentalists and the lobbying efforts of local planners such as Lee Koppelman, executive director of the Long Island Regional Planning Board, raised county and state money to purchase land in the early 1980s.[9]  In May of 1985, the Long Island Regional Planning Board issued the first phase of a long-range preservation plan that hoped to limit development on 30,000 acres of the barrens, conserve 4,000 acres as undeveloped parkland, and place an area population cap to about 125,000, which by this time was about 50,000 people.  The concern was that the undeveloped land was hot real estate and the vital wilderness would be divided into one- and two-acre plots.[10]

In 1987, Suffolk voters approved a sweeping land-acquisition program funded by a quarter-cent sales tax in 1987. Experts convinced the populace that the key to Long Island’s water supply was to protect the Pine Barrens where rain penetrated the sandy soil and moved down into deep aquifers.   More than 35,000 acres in the central barrens was purchased by Suffolk and the state.  Nevertheless, builders such as Wilbur Breslin were moving ahead with development plans.  Local town governments in Brookhaven, Southampton and Riverhead sided with developers and rejected calls for low-density building in watershed areas.[11]

Ultimately, it was the Long Island Pine Barrens Society that played a pivotal role in preservation.  On November 21, 1989, the society filed the biggest environmental lawsuit in state history and quickly won a court order that blocked 238 pending projects valued at $11.2 billion.  Their argument was that before the three towns approved development proposals, each municipality should be forced to study the “cumulative impact” on the environment.  While the towns later won the case in State Supreme Court, the society won the appeal. The final decision was decided by the New York Court of Appeals.  In a unanimous verdict on November 24, 1992, it declared that the court couldn’t force the towns to do a cumulative impact study.  While developers could now forge ahead, they worked with the society and other environmentalists to devise a plan to ban new development inside a 52,500-acre core and tighten restrictions on building in a 47,500-acre buffer zone.  In mid-1993, the State Legislature passed a bill that formalized their agreement and Governor Mario Cuomo signed what was called the Long Island Pine Barrens Preservation Act.  The comprehensive plan for the barrens was finally completed on June 29, 1995.[12]

Pine Barrens trail, Manorville: Location of the former Manorville-Eastport spur (August 3, 2014)
Pine Barrens trail, Manorville: Location of the former Manorville-Eastport spur (August 3, 2014)

The Pine Barrens agreement preserved a 100,000 forest, the last remnant of the great glacier that created Long Island.  While it doesn’t feature the grandeur of Yosemite, the barrens is a humble wilderness with pines and bushy scrub oaks, shallow ponds, and reed-choked swamps.[13]  Today, Suffolk County boasts parkland at Cranberry Bog County Preserve, plus the entire length of the Peconic River.  Annually, the Long Island Greenbelt Trail Conference schedules approximately 150 free, volunteer-led treks.[14]

Eastport

Southeast of Manorville is present-day Eastport lying in both the town of Brookhaven and Southampton.  As early as the 1730s, gristmills were built along three creeks in the area.  At the town line in the center of the village is a large stream called Seatuck River which at one time featured the grounds of the Se-a-tuck Club on its western shore.  On the western border of the village is a small brook called Little Seatuck while to the east is East River.  The one-and-a-half-mile hamlet started as two communities, Seatuck and Waterville.  The section between the Seatuck and East Rivers was called Waterville.  The western section was Seatuck.[15]

Seatuck Cove, Eastport (July 11, 2014)
Seatuck Cove, Eastport (July 11, 2014)

Seatuck and Waterville conjoined in the 1850s and planned to utilize the name Seatuck.  However, the United States Postal Service refused the name Seatuck because it sounded much like Setauket.  Previously, an office was set up at Seatuck on May 15, 1849.  The name was changed to Great Seatuck on December 24, 1856 and the office discontinued on September 23, 1857.[16]  Finally, the name Eastport was adopted by a village meeting in 1860 and a Post Office opened shortly after.  By the late nineteenth century, Eastport was populated by some 350 inhabitants.  There was a church, two gristmills, two stores, a wintergreen oil distillery, a blacksmith, a wheelwright shop, and hotels for summer tourists.  Residents were primarily trout fishermen, sailors, and small farmers.[17]

Seatuck Creek, Eastport (July 11, 2014)
Seatuck Creek, Eastport (July 11, 2014)

Eastport became famous for its duck industry from the turn-of-the twentieth century through the 1940s.[18]  In fact, it was the unofficial capital of Long Island duck farming.  A young man named Warren Washington Hallock began raising ducks at Brushy Neck in 1858.  When a new breed of duck called the Pekin was introduced to the United States in 1873, Hallock started raising them.  Additional duck farmers followed and by 1900 there were twenty-nine farms along the Eastport streams and Moriches Bay.  At one time, Long Island produced 6.5 million of the ducks going to market.  Business boomed until New York State set regulations to curb the pollution from duck foundries, resulting in the closure of many smaller farms.  In the late 1990s the farm of Chet Massey was the sole farm remaining.[19]  However, the Massey farm was scheduled to close at the end of 2014.[20]

Eastport Elementary School, Eastport (July 11, 2014)
Eastport Elementary School, Eastport (July 11, 2014)

Today, on the western border of Eastport lies Spadero Airport, built north of Montauk Highway on land that once contained the right-of-way of the LIRR’s Manorville-Eastport spur.  It opened to the public in June of 1962.[21]  Another notable fixture on Montauk Highway is the white church.  Built in 1853 at a cost of $1,495, the church incorporated in February of 1869.  It was enlarged in 1896 to its present size.  A cornerstone was laid on August 9, 1896 and the building was dedicated on December 20 of the same year.  The congregation was a member of the Eastern Conference of the Methodist Protestant Church until 1939.  Thereafter, it was the Bible Protestant Church until 1946 when it became the Eastport Gospel Church.  Today, it is the Eastport Bible Church.[22]

Spadaro Airport, Eastport (July 11, 2014)
Spadaro Airport, Eastport (July 11, 2014)
East Bible Church, Eastport (July 11, 2014)
East Bible Church, Eastport (July 11, 2014)

Early Long Island Rail Road Service to Manorville and Eastport

The LIRR opened its Main Line to Greenport in July of 1844 as a route to Boston.  The completed road carried passengers from New York to Greenport where they boarded a steamboat bound for Stonington, Connecticut and the Old Colony Railroad to Boston.  Naturally, this was prior to the completion of the New York & New Haven Railroad along the shores of Connecticut.  The Long Island enjoyed several years of profit.[23]

The Main Line traversed the Pine Barrens since the railroad wished for a direct route from Jamaica to Greenport, bypassing major communities along the North and South Shores.  St. George Manor Station was set up at the current crossing of Ryerson Avenue and was on initial train service to Greenport effective July 29, 1844.  For a while, it was the last stop.[24]  After 1852, the station was referred to as Manor.[25]  It proved to be an important segment on the journey to and from Greenport as a place to load wood for the wood-burning locomotives and where passengers consumed refreshments.  The depot was also busy shipping freight in the form of cordwood and Long Island vegetables such as potatoes and cauliflower.[26]  The building was raised in September of 1869 as the LIRR’s Superintendent Barton staked out grounds for a new platform and depot.  During May of 1871, a new building was erected on the west side of the Ryerson Avenue crossing, complete with water tank, tank house, well, and windmill.[27]  The interior of the wooden depot featured a pot-belly stove, several windows and benches on both the north and south sides.  Adjacent to the exterior of the building, a covered loading platform was attached to a freight building.  It was used to store cauliflower, potatoes, beans, and other vegetables to be sent to New York.[28]

Manorville Station
Historical Fact
Date
Station and depot building opened as St. George Manor Station July 29, 1844 (timetable)
Renamed Manor Station After 1852
Depot building razed September 1869
Depot building replaced May 1871
Renamed Manorville Station 1908
Depot building razed June 1941
Three-sided, shed-roofed passenger shelter with roof overhang erected 1941
Last passenger service September 26, 1969 (author’s analysis)
Station closed By May 12, 1980
Passenger shelter razed After 1969 (author’s analysis)
LIRR Manorville Station, depot, water tank, right-of-way to Eastport veers to the right, view east (September 27, 1906: Dave Keller Archive)
LIRR Manorville Station, depot building, water tank, right-of-way to Eastport veers to the right, view east (September 27, 1906: Dave Keller Archive)

Following Seth Raynor’s departure in 1891, Miss Juliet Wilbur was the station agent.  She taught other agents the Morse Code.  The next two station agents were Harry L. Hedger and Ernest M. Robinson.  Cutting and loading wood was an important and profitable business in the early days.  Gilbert Raynor of Manorville employed as many as sixty woodcutters and in one year shipped as much as a thousand cords.[29]

The LIRR’s largest competitor in the 1860s was the South Side Railroad which ran as far as Patchogue on the South Shore.  To insure a monopoly on the East End, the Long Island, under the direction of President Oliver Charlick, planned a branch to Sag Harbor.  Originally, a route from Riverhead was suggested but Riverhead residents were apathetic to a branch road and content with their own facilities.  It was for this reason, and since Charlick wanted a railroad within the South Side Railroad’s stagecoach range at Bellport, that Manorville was suggested as the split location.  Eastport on the South Shore was selected as the point where the road was to turn eastward to Sag Harbor.  Additionally, a stagecoach route was to be set up in the Moriches.[30]  For the branch right-of-way, Gilbert Raynor loaned property, including a portion of his front lawn, to the railroad “for as long as they needed it.”[31]  The Sag Harbor Branch was completed on May 9, 1870.  Summer timetables went into effect on May 16 with a total of four passenger trains, two in each direction, and one morning freight train.[32]

A station stop called Moriches was established in Eastport, in the area of what was formerly called Seatuck.  It was located on the east side of the Montauk Highway crossing, north of the tracks, in an area called Robinson’s Crossing.  In February of 1870, construction of the depot building began.[33]  It was completed the following month.[34]  By the winter of 1877, there were two daily eastbound trains that arrived at Manor at 11:25 a.m. and 6:23 p.m., Monday through Saturday.  From Manor the consist split, one section going to Greenport and the other Sag Harbor.  The westbound timetable scheduled two trains from points east that joined at Manor at 8:01 a.m. and 3:50 p.m.[35]  For the summer timetable, there was an additional train both eastbound and westbound on Saturdays.[36]

Moriches Station
Historical Fact
Date
Station and depot building opened March 1870
Renamed Eastport August 1881
Station closed and relocated to new location October 18, 1881
Location of the former LIRR Moriches Station, Montauk Highway crossing, view east (July 11, 2014)
Location of the former LIRR Moriches Station, Montauk Highway crossing, view east (July 11, 2014)

Extension of the Southern Road to Eastport

In June of 1879, what remained of the South Side Railroad was sold under a mortgage foreclosure.  By November, it was conveyed to the newly-organized Brooklyn & Montauk Railroad Company which was immediately leased to the LIRR as its Montauk Division.[37]  In 1881, the road was extended eastward from Patchogue to a junction with the LIRR at Eastport, creating a continuous rail line along the South Shore to Sag Harbor.[38]  On Sunday July 17, it was formerly opened to traffic[39] with regular service set to commence on August 1.[40]

Since a station was established in the Moriches proper, the old Moriches Station was renamed Eastport in August of 1881[41] by an order issued in July.[42]  By September of 1881, railroad officials planned to relocate the newly-established Eastport Station near the center of the village.[43]  Indeed, the depot building was moved to a new location about 2,600 feet east[44] on October 18, 1881 and put into service the next day.[45]  It was now located west of Union Street, north of tracks.[46]

Eastport Station
Historical Fact
Date
Station and depot building opened October 19, 1881
Depot building remodeled Late 1940s (author’s analysis)
Last passenger service October 3, 1958 (author’s analysis)
Station closed October 6, 1958
Depot building sold 1962 (author’s analysis)
LIRR Eastport Station, view west (November 29, 1952: Robert M. Emery Long Island Rail Road Collection, Book 7 (photo 188), Special Collections, Stony Brook University Libraries)
LIRR Eastport Station, platform and depot building, view west (November 29, 1952: Robert M. Emery Long Island Rail Road Collection, Book 7 (photo 188), Special Collections, Stony Brook University Libraries)

Introduction of the Spur as a Cutoff and Roundtrip Service between the North and South Shores

Following the extension of the southern road, railroad officials proposed the abandonment of the tracks between Manor and Eastport since it was no longer needed as part of a branch line.  However, residents disputed this claiming that discontinuation of service would be an inconvenience for those traveling to the county seat in Riverhead from the South Shore.[47]  In late August of 1881 the Riverhead Village Improvement Society demanded that trains run between Eastport and Manor to allow passengers to travel between the shores.  Additionally, the society suggested construction of a road linking Riverhead and Eastport.[48]  While the latter did not happen, the spur was converted to both a cutoff for trains between the Main Line and Montauk Division and a means to travel within the North and South Forks whereby Manorville or Eastport was used as a transfer point.  The latter inspired the nicknames “scoot,” “Cape Horn,” and “peanut train.”  Scoot was derived because of its limited size.  Cape Horn was prompted by the route’s semicircle course.  Lastly, peanut train was precipitated in light of the spur’s paltry profits.[49]

East River, Eastport (July 11, 2014)
East River, Eastport (July 11, 2014)

As a cutoff, the spur persisted as a location where trains both split and joined at Manor, traveling to and from both shores.  To facilitate its new role, an additional switch was installed at Manor, east of the station in the Pine Barrens, that connected to a set of tracks running southwestwardly to the spur forging a wye so that trains from Eastport could travel eastwardly onto the Main Line and vice versa.  To expedite trains in Eastport, northbound to Manor and both east and westbound along the Montauk Division, the railroad lengthened the switch at Eastport Station to 1,500 feet in the summer of 1883.[50]

Pine Barrens trail, Manorville: Location of the former Manorville-Eastport spur, west section of wye (August 3, 2014)
Pine Barrens trail, Manorville: Location of the former Manorville-Eastport spur, west section of wye (August 3, 2014)

In its heyday from the early 1880s to the end of the 1920s, the cutoff as a travel means between the forks carried up to 100 passengers a day, and both mail and cargo.  Typically, mail exchange between the local carrier and the train occurred twice a day: on the late morning train from Manhattan and again on the late afternoon consist traveling to Manhattan.[51]  In the fall of 1881, the daily railroad timetable featured two midday roundtrips from Greenport to Sag Harbor via Manor and Eastport.[52]  To underscore its new express train from Long Island City to Sag Harbor for the summer of 1883, the consist traveled on the Central Division and Main Line to Manor, then south along the cutoff to Eastport, and finally east to Sag Harbor, making only five stops.[53]

Pine Barrens trail, Manorville: Location of the former Manorville-Eastport spur, east section of wye (August 3, 2014) Pine Barrens trail, Manorville: Location of the former Manorville-Eastport spur, east section of wye (August 3, 2014)
Pine Barrens trail, Manorville: Location of the former Manorville-Eastport spur, east section of wye (August 3, 2014)
Pine Barrens trail, Manorville: Location of the former Manorville-Eastport spur, east section of wye (August 3, 2014)

By the summer of 1895, roundtrip service between Greenport and Eastport via Manor was set up on the Monday through Saturday daily timetable.  While there were typically one or two daily roundtrips, it was also possible to utilize Manor or Eastport to travel within the forks by connecting with both Main Line and Montauk Division trains.[54]   For example, roundtrip train number 143 arrived in Eastport at 10:47 a.m., where it connected with number 11 bound for Amagansett.  It then traveled to Greenport via Manor.  Leaving Greenport at 2:05 p.m. as number 146, it traveled to Eastport where it connected with Montauk Division train number 36.  Additionally, for the daily East End escape, express train number 109 ran on the Main Line to Manor and then split into two consists at 4:40 p.m.: one to Greenport and the other to Amagansett via the cutoff.  For the return to Long Island City, number 110 was comprised of a consist that left Amagansett at 7:28 p.m. and another that left Greenport at 7:46 p.m.  They joined in Manorville at 8:50 p.m. before heading west.[55]

Three summers later, an additional roundtrip between Greenport and Eastport was added to the Monday through Saturday daily timetable.  Beginning with number 891, the first roundtrip started at Eastport at 7:31 a.m. and returned from Greenport as number 892.  The second included numbers 893 and 894.  The East End getaway train did not run via the cutoff at this time.[56]

By the summer of 1903, the daily getaway express train number 109 to the East End, known as the Long Island Express, split at Manor and traveled to both forks as number 811.  Typically, the last three cars were uncoupled and the train continued to Greenport.  A steam engine, waiting on the spur, was coupled to the three cars and continued onto Montauk.[57]  Train number 110 from Amagansett was now run in the mornings via the spur on its way to Long Island City where it joined with a portion of Main Line number 110 from Greenport in Manor at 8:02 a.m.   The remainder of Main Line 110 traveled via the cutoff to Eastport, connecting with an Amagansett train at 8:20 a.m.  The tandem of roundtrips from 892 through 895 provided roundtrip service from Amagansett to Greenport via the cutoff.  Sunday service also featured consists that split and rejoined at Manor.  Westbound number 280 from both Amagansett and Greenport joined at Manor at 8:54 a.m. while eastbound number 281 split at Manor at 6:11 p.m.[58]

As of 1908, Manor Station was called Manorville.[59]  By the fall of 1916, roundtrip service to and from Amagansett and Greenport via the cutoff was cut to one consist.  Train number 187 left Amagansett at 10:20 a.m. and entered the spur in Eastport at 11:50 a.m.  It headed east at Manorville and arrived in Greenport at 1:12 p.m.  On the return, number 283 departed Greenport at 2:13 p.m. and arrived in Amagansett at 5:02 p.m.  A shortened version of the roundtrip ran in the morning.  Number 134 traveled from Manorville to Eastport, connecting with New York-bound number 203 at Manorville and Montauk-bound number 4 in Eastport.  Thence, number 134 became Main Line number 135 on a run to Greenport.[60]

LIRR Timetable Effective October 17, 1916: Timetable indicates Main Line and Montauk Division trains utilizing the Manorville-Eastport spur
LIRR Timetable Effective October 17, 1916: Timetable indicates Main Line and Montauk Division trains utilizing the Manorville-Eastport spur

Improvements under Pennsylvania Railroad ownership included East End parlor car service with named trains such as the New York or Long Island Express.  By the summer of 1928, the early morning westbound Cannonball (train number 3 to Jamaica and New York) utilized the cutoff, as did number 280 bound for Greenport.  Roundtrip service at this time was once again set at two.  Both numbers 195 and 283 connected at Eastport with Montauk Division trains bound for either Amagansett or New York.  On Sundays, two shuttles (numbers 4014 and 4005) ran between Montauk and Manorville, one eastbound and one westbound, to connect passengers to North Fork service.[61]

LIRR Timetable Effective May 23, 1928: Timetable indicates Main Line and Montauk Division trains utilizing the Manorville-Eastport Spur
LIRR Timetable Effective May 23, 1928: Timetable indicates Main Line and Montauk Division trains utilizing the Manorville-Eastport Spur

Throughout the 1930s, the cutoff shuttled passengers from the North Shore to the South Shore.  By 1932, the daily Cannonball express to the East End was renumbered 20, running via the cutoff to Montauk.[62]  By 1935, the Cannonball ran as a combined consist that split in Manorville at 5:28 p.m., with number 20 on its way to Montauk and 286 arriving in Greenport at 6:18 p.m.  On summer Saturdays, the combined number 12/203 also split in Manorville, with number 12 to Montauk as the Shinnecock Express and 203 to Greenport as the Peconic Bay Express.[63]  On Fridays the Cannonball ran without its Greenport section.  Instead, number 286 left New York immediately after.[64]

In the latter half of the 1930s, daily roundtrip service between the forks was discontinued.  Also, by 1937 there were only two express trains to the South Fork that used the cutoff via Manorville:  the Cannonball (bypassing a Manorville station stop at 5:21 p.m. on weekdays) and the Shinnecock Express (bypassing it on Saturdays, at 2:18 p.m.).[65]

Limited passenger use of the cutoff continued into the war years.[66] However, following the war, railroad timetables during the summer of 1946 indicated that the Shinnecock Express was the lone train utilizing the cutoff on its way to Montauk on summer Saturdays.[67] Additionally, the station agent at Manorville was discontinued after the LIRR was granted approval in May of 1938. The depot building was torn down in June of 1941 and a three-sided, shed-roofed passenger shelter with a roof overhang was constructed.[68] Freight service remained at the station until the railroad was granted permission to end less-than-carload on January 28, 1960. Lastly, by the fall of 1946 the cutoff was removed from timetables and after March 3, 1949 the cutoff was no longer used.[69]

On June 2, 1949, trustees of the then-bankrupt LIRR applied for authorization in Federal District Court to abandon the cutoff.  Claiming that there was no regular passenger or freight service since June of 1944 and that the tracks were only used twice a year to run a single freight train, trustees David E. Smucker and Hunter Delatour asked Federal Judge Harold M. Kennedy for permission to ask the Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) for an abandonment certificate and authorization to sell the physical assets of the spur.  A hearing was scheduled for June 10.[70]  Opponents of track abandonment cited that the cutoff was a vital eastern link between the railroad’s Main Line and Montauk Division.  In fact, the Brookhaven Town Board Supervisor Philipp A. Hattemer warned that discontinuation discouraged future industry in the area.[71]  According to the board, the spur was used every season to store freight cars for potato loading.  The board added that loss of the rails meant a “terrific loss of revenue to the town in general” and that the line was invaluable for rerouting trains.  Nevertheless, on November 25, the day after Thanksgiving of 1949, the ICC approved the LIRR’s request to abandon the 5.78 mile spur from Manorville to Eastport.[72]  The railroad tracks were removed in the winter of 1950.[73]

Discontinuation of Eastport Station

Following the abandonment of the Manorville-Eastport spur, Eastport Station received frequent passenger service on trains servicing the Montauk Division.  Between 1951 and 1955, on the Monday through Saturday schedule there were roughly half-dozen trains or less daily in both directions.  A slightly reduced timetable was available on Sundays.[74]  In fact, the depot building was slated to be replaced in the late-1940s. While this never occurred, it was remodeled and later received a new coat of paint in June of 1955.[75]

Nevertheless, as the railroad emerged from bankruptcy and embarked on a revitalization program in the mid-1950s, passenger service to Eastport was reduced.  By 1956, weekday service was under five trains a day in both directions.[76]  Then, in the spring of 1958, the LIRR planned to petition the New York State Public Service Commission (PSC) to discontinue Eastport service.  Citing that only ten regular commuters boarded trains at Eastport, East Moriches, and Brookhaven in a two-week period, the railroad asked the PSC on June 5 for permission to close all three stations.  According to LIRR attorney William A. Colton, nine riders got on trains at Eastport and three got off during a survey period.  A man named Joseph L. Parisi was the only commuter who boarded the train daily in Eastport.[77]

Regardless if it received abandonment authorization, the LIRR set out to make changes.  For the fall schedule effective September 2, 1958, weekend service was suspended and weekday service was limited to an eastbound flag stop by train number 38 to Speonk at 7:00 p.m. and a westbound flag stop by number 31 to Jamaica at 5:26 a.m.[78]  Also, on August 12 the railroad unveiled a plan to eliminate agents at fifteen Suffolk stations, including Eastport.  Officials claimed the downsizing would not reduce passenger or freight service as management would be consolidated over the region by a district manager.[79]

Meanwhile, the PSC authorized the LIRR to discontinue passenger service and the direct handling of less-than-carload freight at Eastport.[80]  A public hearing was scheduled Friday, October 3 for residents to raise objections.[81]  Nevertheless, the railroad continued with its plans and the station was out of service the following Monday.[82]  In December, the LIRR suspended less-than-carload freight at Eastport and the station agent.[83]  The depot building was sold in 1962 and moved to the property of Stan Durst on the corner of Tuthill Avenue and Montauk Highway.[84]

Location of the former LIRR Eastport Station, view west (July 11, 2014)
Location of the former LIRR Eastport Station, view west (July 11, 2014)

The former location of the Eastport depot building and station was the subject of a court battle in the early 1980s.  In light of accident liability, the LIRR closed select private crossings in Eastport.  However, residents brought the railroad to court and State Supreme Court Justice William Underwood ruled that the crossings be reopened.[85]

LIRR Union Street (East Moriches Boulevard) crossing, view east (July 11, 2014)
LIRR Union Street (East Moriches Boulevard) crossing, view east (July 11, 2014)

Emergence of Road ‘N’ Rail and Discontinuation of Manorville Station

In the 1960s and 1970s, the LIRR operated a bus route between Greenport and Huntington as a combination Road ‘N’ Rail program.  It was authorized by the PSC on January 17, 1962 and buses first ran on February 19.  As a cheaper alternative than rail service, it was established for economic reasons.  Officials believed that it would attract passengers for short hops since it ran through a heavily-populated area that had no rail stations.

After bus service commenced, the railroad was permitted to discontinue one westbound train out of Greenport and one eastbound to Greenport leading to reduced LIRR service at Manorville Station.[86]  The lack of a reliable train schedule, and for the fact that Manorville remained sparsely populated, indirectly influenced the discontinuation of the station stop.  While not a busy East End depot, Manorville had as many as six to nine commuters in the 1930s.[87]  In the postwar years, the Manorville train schedule was minimal to say the least.  In 1951, there were three eastbound trains on the Monday through Saturday schedule, with two on Sunday.  Westbound there were two trains running Monday through Friday as well as Sundays, but three on Saturdays.[88]  By 1955, service was reduced to two trains in each direction daily.[89]  The schedule remained until the creation of the bus route.[90] 

Effective March 5, 1962, the discontinuation of the aforementioned weekday westbound train from Greenport (number 205) eliminated the Manorville flag stop at 6:51 a.m. while the cancellation of the eastbound (number 214) removed the 6:42 p.m. flag stop.[91]  What remained was a single train daily in each direction during the non-rush-hour timeslot to and from Jamaica: number 211 made a westbound flag stop at 4:07 p.m. and number 204 made a 10:43 a.m. eastbound flag.  Effective March 10, the single Saturday and Sunday train in both directions was suited for East End excursions: a morning eastbound and a late-day westbound, both flag stops.[92]

LIRR Manorville Station, view east (Circa 1968: Dave Keller Archive)
LIRR Manorville Station, platform and shelter, view east (Circa 1968: Dave Keller Archive)

The bus route primarily traveled along New York State Route 25 Jericho Turnpike.  The closest stop was in Ridge at Hay Road, east of the current William Floyd Parkway, several miles away.  Service was six buses each way weekdays, and four on the weekends.[93]  While Manorville rail ridership was probably already minimal, no doubt lack of commuter scheduling led to further decline.

In light of its popularity, another bus route was initiated on the South Shore from Amityville to Montauk after approval from the PSC on May 11, 1963.  Like the North Shore route, six roundtrips a day would supplement rail service.[94]  The new line reestablished LIRR service to Eastport.  A bus stop was set up at Union Street (East Moriches Blvd) and New York State Route 27A Montauk Highway.[95]

Following its takeover of the LIRR in 1966, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) came under scrutiny for both rail service and maintenance.  In particular, the upkeep of rail stations became the subject of debate because under the Public Authority Law of the State of New York (Section 1277) both Nassau and Suffolk Counties were liable for the cost of the operation, maintenance, and use of passenger stations.  Beginning in 1967, Brookhaven Town Supervisor Charles W. Barraud annually reported what the total maintenance expenditure entailed.  For all Suffolk stations, the county received a $1 million bill.  In Brookhaven town alone the annual charge was $85,605 to maintain, and $98,854 to operate, thirteen stations.[96]

The Manorville operating cost was $399.23 a year.[97] Following MTA annexation, the schedule was restricted to weekdays only, with eastbound train number 204 making a station stop at 10:49 a.m. and westbound number 211 at 4:01 p.m.[98]

Dissatisfaction over the rising maintenance costs continued.  In 1969, Barraud reported that Brookhaven’s maintenance fee was $209,772.36 annually, with Manorville operation at $430.30 yearly.  He cited that the State Legislature refused to amend the statute for station responsibility and noted that since the county was paying the upkeep bills it should have control over operation and expenditure.[99]  State Senator Bernard Smith of Northport and Assemblyman John G. McCarthy also chimed in and, speaking for railroad commuters whom they represented, put forth that the MTA owed the counties money.  They recommended a six-point program that called for a revitalized maintenance program.[100]

LIRR Ryerson Avenue crossing, view east, Manorville (July 13, 2013)
LIRR Ryerson Avenue crossing, view east, Manorville (July 13, 2013)

Indeed, the year 1969 was a bad year for the LIRR.  During a ten-day period in the summer months about 635,000 commuters were affected by trains that were more than ten minutes late, including more than 140,000 whose trains were cancelled.[101]  Uproar led to State Governor Nelson Rockefeller proclaiming that by October 7 the LIRR was to provide the finest commuter service in the country.  However, train issues continued.[102]  By the end of the month, it was reported that only 82.31 percent of trains reached their destination within five and a half minutes of the scheduled time.[103]  While the situation somewhat improved upon Rockefeller’s deadline date, commuter associations were critical as trains were in poor condition and overcrowded.[104]

Amidst all the railroad drama, service at Manorville was discontinued as per new fall timetables effective September 29.  The station stops for train number 204 at 10:50 a.m. and 211 at 3:58 p.m. were eliminated.[105]  Indeed, discontent over station maintenance fees, low ridership, and the railroad’s attempt to streamline scheduling, signaled termination of the old Main Line station and the Manorville shelter was removed.  The station remained listed in LIRR employee timetables through May of 1979. By May of 1980, it was removed.[106]

Location of the former LIRR Manorville Station and the Maples, view west (June 27, 2014)
Location of the former LIRR Manorville Station and the Maples, view west (June 27, 2014)

Additionally, bus service to both Ridge and Eastport was short-lived.  In early summer of 1973, the LIRR discontinued direct Huntington to Riverhead bus service, relying on a faster Long Island Expressway route,[107] and the Ridge bus stop, moved to Ridge Road and Jericho Turnpike by 1970,[108] was eliminated.  The Eastport stop was removed from the South Shore route by 1973 as well.

Conclusion

To some extent, criticism of station maintenance helped.  In February of 1970, LIRR President Walter L. Schlager, Jr. ordered all stations in Suffolk to be repainted and cleaned.[109]  However, the harmony was only temporary as issues reappeared in the early 1980s.  In August of 1981, Suffolk County Executive Peter Cohalan announced that Suffolk was joining four upstate counties in filing a lawsuit against the MTA in light of unfair maintenance fees.[110]  One gripe was that Suffolk was charged for stations formerly discontinued.  In fact, in an audit under supervision of Comptroller Joseph Caputo, the LIRR overcharged Suffolk $750,000 in the period April 1, 1980 to March 31, 1981, with $10,700 for maintenance of Manorville, Setauket, Blue Point, and Bayport Stations, which were all closed by the railroad.[111]

In the summer of 1980, Suffolk County initiated a $3.5 million bus service for the North and South Forks.  Known as the S-92, the new route was similar to the former roundtrip service provided by the LIRR from Montauk to Greenport.  Indeed, the bus is still in service today.  However, the rather slow method of traveling from the North to the South Shore is no comparison to the complex service that was provided in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century.[112]

 

Next page: Discontinued Station Stops: The History of the Moriches and the Termination of Railroad Service

 
___________________________________________________________

[1] Staff of Long Island, Our Story, Home Town Long Island: the History of Every Community on Long Island in Stories and Photographs (Melville, NY: Newsday, 1999), 78.

[2] Richard M. Bayles, Historical and Descriptive Sketches of Suffolk County with a Historical Outline of Long Island (Port Washington, NY: Ira J. Friedman Inc., 1962), 254.

[3] “Manorville History,” Manorville Chamber, accessed November 15, 2014, http://www.manorvillechamber.org/manorville-history.html.

[4] Staff of Long Island, Our Story, Home Town Long Island, 78.

[5] Bayles, Historical and Descriptive Sketches of Suffolk County, 254.

[6] Lisa Doll Bruno, “Living in Manorville: Big Houses and Bucolic Landscape,” Newsday (Combined Editions), March 25, 2005, http://www.proquest.com.

[7] “Shrine History,” Shrine of Our Lady of the Island, accessed November 25, 2014, http://www.ourladyoftheisland.org/Home/Welcome/tabid/115/Default.aspx.

[8] Paul Vitello, “Living in LI’s Last Frontier,” Newsday (1940-1986), May 19, 1985, http://www.proquest.com; Dan Fagin, “Long Island: Our Story Chapter 9,” Newsday (All Editions), June 21, 1997, http://www.proquest.com.

[9] Ibid.

[10] Vitello, “Living in LI’s Last Frontier.”

[11] Ibid.

[12] Ibid.

[13] Ibid.

[14] Barbara Shea, “Discover Long Island: The Pine Barrens,” Newsday (Nassau and Suffolk Edition), October 12, 2001, http://www.proquest.com.

[15] Staff of Long Island, Home Town Long Island, 137; Henry Isham Hazelton, The Boroughs of Brooklyn and Queens, Counties of Nassau and Suffolk, Long Island, New York, 1609-1924 (New York: Lewis Historical, 1925), 801; Bayles, Historical and Descriptive Sketches of Suffolk County, 280.

[16] LeRoy Wilcox, History of Eastport, L.I., N.Y., 1775-1975, and Eastport Gospel Church, 1822-1975 (L. Wilcox: Eastport, NY, 1975.) 29.

[17] Staff of Long Island, Home Town Long Island, 137; Bayles, Historical and Descriptive Sketches of Suffolk County, 279-280.

[18] “Area History,” Westhampton Beach Historical Society, accessed November 15, 2014, http://www.whbhistorical.org/new-area-history.

[19] Staff of Long Island, Home Town Long Island, 137; “Area History.”

[20] Jim Merritt, “Just Ducky,” Newsday (Combined Editions), October 22, 2014, http:www.proquest.com.

[21] “Spadero Airport,” AirNav.com, accessed November 29, 2014, http://www.airnav.com/airport/1n2.

[22] Wilcox, History of Eastport, 41.

[23] “‘Iron Horse’” Made Many Changes in the Life of Early Manorville,” Patchogue Advance, December 9, 1965, http://apa3.olivesoftware.com.

[24] Van R. Field and Mary E. Field, Old Manorville (Manorville, NY: Ketcham Inn Foundation, Inc., 2006.), 22.

[25] Vincent F. Seyfried, The Long Island Rail Road: A Comprehensive History, vol. 3, Age of Expansion (Garden City, NY: Seyfried, 1984), 192; “Long Island Railroad Co.” Brooklyn Eagle, July 26, 1844, http://bklyn.newspapers.com/image/50251044/?terms=brooklyn%2Bgreenport.

[26] “‘Iron Horse’” Made Many Changes.”

[27] Seyfried, The Long Island Rail Road: A Comprehensive History, vol. 3, 192; “Sup’t Barton of the L.I.R.R.,” Corrector (Sag Harbor), September 25, 1869, http://apa3.olivesoftware.com.

[28] Dorothy K. Magnani, History of Manorville (Kearney, NE: Morris Publishing Co., 2007), 102-103.

[29] Ibid., 100-101; “Manor,” South Side Signal (Babylon), May 9, 1891, http://apa3.olivesoftware.com.

[30] Seyfried, The Long Island Rail Road: A Comprehensive History, vol. 3, 34-35.

[31] Magnani, History of Manorville, 100.

[32] Ibid., 45-46.

[33] Ibid., 194.

[34] Vincent F. Seyfried, The Long Island Rail Road: A Comprehensive History, vol. 6, The Golden Age 1881-1900 (Garden City, NY: Seyfried, 1984), 272.

[35] “The Long Island Traveler,” Long Island Traveler (Southold), January 3, 1878, http://apa3.olivesoftware.com.

[36] “L.I.R.R. Timetable,” Long Island Traveler (Southold), July 31, 1879, http://apa3.olivesoftware.com.

[37] Hazelton, The Boroughs of Brooklyn and Queens, Counties of Nassau and Suffolk, 402.

[38] Ibid., 406.

[39] “Gossip on the Rail,” South Side Signal (Babylon), July 16, 1881, http://apa3.olivesoftware.com.

[40] “Gossip on the Rail,” South Side Signal (Babylon), July 23, 1881, http://apa3.olivesoftware.com.

[41] Seyfried, The Long Island Rail Road: A Comprehensive History, vol. 6, 272.

[42] Seyfried, The Long Island Rail Road: A Comprehensive History, vol. 3, 194.

[43] “Eastport & Speonk,” South Side Signal (Babylon), September 10, 1881, http://apa3.olivesoftware.com.

[44] Wilcox, History of Eastport, 29.

[45] “Long Island Rail Road: Alphabetical Station Listing and History,” Trains are Fun, accessed July 16, 2013, http://www.trainsarefun.com/lirrphotos/LIRR%20Station%20History.htm.

[46] Seyfried, The Long Island Rail Road: A Comprehensive History, vol. 6, 272.

[47] “Gossip on the Rail,” South Side Signal (Babylon), August 20, 1881, http://apa3.olivesoftware.com.

[48] “Babylon Record,” South Side Signal (Babylon), August 27, 1881, http://apa3.olivesoftware.com.

[49] Rick Brand, “Train Joining the Forks is now a Missing Link,” Newsday (1940-1986), May 21, 1980, http://www.proquest.com.

[50]  “Eastport & Speonk,” South Side Signal (Babylon), August 4, 1883, http://apa3.olivesoftware.com.

[51] Magnani, History of Manorville, 105.

[52]  “Travelers’ Guide,” South Side Signal (Babylon), October 29, 1881, http://apa3.olivesoftware.com.

[53]  “Gossip on the Rail,” South Side Signal (Babylon), February 24, 1883, http://apa3.olivesoftware.com.

[54] Brand, “Train Joining the Forks is now a Missing Link.”

[55] Robert M. Emery Long Island Rail Road Collection, Box 13, Special Collections, Stony Brook University Libraries, Main Line &Montauk Division, Effective June 27, 1895, by Long Island Rail Road (New York: Long Island Rail Road, 1895).

[56] Robert M. Emery Long Island Rail Road Collection, Box 13, Special Collections, Stony Brook University Libraries, Main Line &Montauk Division, Effective June 23, 1898, by Long Island Rail Road (New York: Long Island Rail Road, 1898).

[57] Van R. Field and Mary E. Field, Old Manorville, 26.

[58] Long Island Railroad Company, Long Island Railroad Company Time Table No. 26, For the Government and Information of Employees only, in effect 12.01 A.M., Wednesday, May 27th, 1903 (New York: Long Island Railroad Company, 1903).

[59] Robert M. Emery Long Island Rail Road Collection, Box 13, Special Collections, Stony Brook University Libraries, Main Line, Effective June 25, 1908, by Long Island Rail Road (New York: Long Island Rail Road, 1908).

[60] Long Island Railroad, Effective October 17th, 1916, Corrected to Dec. 6th, 1916, Long Island Railroad Schedule of Trains (New York: Long Island Railroad, 1916).

[61] Long Island Railroad, Taking effect May 23, 1928, Daylight Saving Time, Long Island Railroad Time Tables (New York: Long Island Railroad, 1928.)

[62] Robert M. Emery Long Island Rail Road Collection, Box 13, Special Collections, Stony Brook University Libraries, Montauk Division, Effective November 27, 1932, by Long Island Rail Road (New York: Long Island Rail Road, 1932).

[63] Robert M. Emery Long Island Rail Road Collection, Box 13, Special Collections, Stony Brook University Libraries, Main Line, Central Park, Ronkonkoma, Riverhead, Greenport and Intermediate Stations, Effective September 15, 1935, by Long Island Rail Road (New York: Long Island Rail Road, 1935).

[64] Mike Boland, “The Route of the Weekend Chief,” Keystone 28, no. 3 (Autumn 1995): 22.

[65] Long Island Railroad, Pennsylvania Railroad, New York Zone, Long Island Railroad, Time Table No. 8, In effect 2.00 a.m. Sunday, September 19, 1937, for the Government of Employes Only, Eastern Standard Time (New York: Long Island Railroad, 1937).

[66] Long Island Rail Road, Long Island Rail Road Time Tables, Schedule in effect 2:00 AM September 20, 1942 (New York: Long Island Rail Road, 1942).

[67] Robert M. Emery Long Island Rail Road Collection, Box 16, Special Collections, Stony Brook University Libraries, Main Line and Montauk Branch, Effective June 9, 1946, by Long Island Rail Road (New York: Long Island Rail Road, 1946).

[68] “Set Rail Station Changes,” Suffolk County News (Sayville), May 20, 1938, http://apa3.olivesoftware.com; Seyfried, The Long Island Rail Road: A Comprehensive History, vol. 6, 263.

[69] “LIRR Gets OK on Change in Freight Setup,” Newsday (1940-1986), January 28, 1960, http://www.proquest.com; Boland, “The Route of the Weekend Chief,” 21; Box 5, Book 15, Robert M. Emery Long Island Rail Road Collection, Special Collections, Stony Brook University Libraries.

[70] “LIRR Hones Economy Axe for Suffolk Spur,” Newsday (1940-1986), June 3, 1949, http://www.proquest.com.

[71] “Joins Battle to Save Spur,” County Review, June 16, 1949, http://apa3.olivesoftware.com.

[72] “Okay LIRR Plea to Ditch Spur,” Newsday (1940-1986), November 28, 1949, http://www.proquest.com.

[73] Wilcox, History of Eastport, 29.

[74] Long Island Rail Road, Schedule in effect September 9, 1951, Long Island Rail Road, William H. Draper, Jr., Trustee, Time Tables (New York: Long Island Rail Road, 1951), Montauk Branch; Long Island Rail Road, Schedule in effect October 3, 1955, Long Island Rail Road Time Tables (New York: Long Island Rail Road, 1955), Montauk Branch.

[75]  “LIRR Stations Get Paint Brush in Area,” Patchogue Advance, June 9, 1955, http://apa3.olivesoftware.com; “LIRR Plans New Rail Station at Eastport,” Patchogue Advance, October 30, 1947, http://apa3.olivesoftware.com.

[76] Long Island Rail Road, Schedule in effect September 10, 1956, Long Island Rail Road Time Tables (New York: Long Island Rail Road, 1956), Montauk Branch.

[77] Walt Brevig, “Trainman, Spare My Ride, Long LIer Begs,” Newsday (1940-1986), June 6, 1958, http://www.proquest.com.

[78] Long Island Rail Road, Schedule in Effect September 2, 1958, Long Island Rail Road, Time Tables (New York: Long Island Rail Road, 1958), Montauk Branch.

[79] “To Cut Agents, Seek Freight: LIRR Unveils Major Streamlining Plan,” Patchogue Advance, August 14, 1958, http://apa3.olivesoftware.com.

[80] “LIRR Set to Stop Brookhaven, EM, Eastport Service,” Patchogue Advance, September 18, 1958, http://apa3.olivesoftware.com.

[81] “Hearing on LIRR Service Plans Set,” Patchogue Advance, September 25, 1958, http://apa3.olivesoftware.com.

[82] “Long Island Rail Road: Alphabetical Station Listing and History.”

[83] “LIRR Gets OK to Cut Agents at 15 Stations,” Patchogue Advance, December 18, 1958, http://apa3.olivesoftware.com.

[84] Wilcox, History of Eastport, 29.

[85] Jeff Sommer, “Court Rescues Home Marooned by LIRR,” Newsday (1940-1986), March 24, 1981, http://www.proquest.com.

[86] “LIRR Buses Get OK; Runs Begin Feb. 19,” Newsday (1940-1986), January 18, 1962, http://www.proquest.com.

[87] Long Island Railroad, “Long Island Commuters,” Long Island Railroad Information Bulletin 8, no.1 (January – February 1931): 8.

[88] Long Island Rail Road, Schedule in effect September 9, 1951, Main Line.

[89] Long Island Rail Road, Schedule in effect October 3, 1955, Main Line.

[90] Long Island Rail Road, Schedule in Effect September 11, 1961, Long Island Rail Road, Time Tables (New York: Long Island Rail Road, 1961), Main Line.

[91] “Here’s Great News for Southold,” The Watchman (East Hampton), February 22, 1962, http://apa3.olivesoftware.com.

[92] Long Island Rail Road, Schedule in Effect September 17, 1962; Long Island Rail Road, Time Tables (New York: Long Island Rail Road, 1962), Main Line.

[93] Robert M. Emery Long Island Rail Road Collection, Box 14, Special Collections, Stony Brook University Libraries, Long Island Rail Road Timetables, Effective May 19, 1963, by Long Island Rail Road (New York: Long Island Rail Road, 1963), Main Line.

[94] Byron Porterfield, “L.I. South Shore to Get Bus Line,” New York Times (1923- Current file), May 11, 1963, http://www.proquest.com.

[95] Robert M. Emery Long Island Rail Road Collection, Box 14, Special Collections, Stony Brook University Libraries, Long Island Rail Road Timetables, Effective May 17, 1964, by Long Island Rail Road (New York: Long Island Rail Road, 1964), Montauk Branch.

[96] Charles W. Barraud, “In Brookhaven,” Patchogue Advance, June 24, 1967, http://apa3.olivesoftware.com.

[97] Ibid.

[98] Robert M. Emery Long Island Rail Road Collection, Box 18, Special Collections, Stony Brook University Libraries, Long Island Rail Road Employee Timetables, Effective September 13, 1965, by Long Island Rail Road (New York: Long Island Rail Road, 1965), Main Line; Long Island Rail Road, Long Island Rail Road Timetable No. 1, in effect 12:01 AM, Sunday, May 22, 1966 (New York: Long Island Rail Road, 1966), Main Line.)

[99] Charles W. Barraud, “In Brookhaven,” Patchogue Advance, June 12, 1969, http://apa3.olivesoftware.com.

[100] “Smith and McCarthy Ask Better Service on LIRR,” Long Islander (Huntington), October 10, 1968, http://apa3.olivesoftware.com.

[101] Mal Karman, “Those Who Wait for LIRR also Serve (Late Dinners): Lest We Forget the Commuter’s Wife,” Newsday (1940-1986), August 20, 1969, http://www.proquest.com.

[102] “The Track Record,” Newsday (1940-1986), September 19, 1969, http://www.proquest.com.

[103] Maureen O’Niell, “LIRR out of Step with Gov’s Pledge,” Newsday (1940-1986), September 30, 1969, http://www.proquest.com.

[104] Maureen O’Niell and Lewis Grossberger, “Commuters still Asking, Is this any way to Run a Railroad,” Newsday (1940-1986), October 8, 1969, http://www.proquest.com.

[105] Robert M. Emery Long Island Rail Road Collection, Box 18, Special Collections, Stony Brook University Libraries, Long Island Rail Road Employee Timetables, Effective May 26, 1969, by Long Island Rail Road (New York: Long Island Rail Road, 1969), Main Line; Roy R. Silver, “L.I.R.R. Timetable Is Put into Effect: Only 25 Trains Eliminated on Line’s Fall Schedule,” New York Times (1923-Current file), September 30, 1969, http://www.proquest.com.

[106] “Long Island Rail Road: Alphabetical Station Listing and History.”

[107] “Getting There by Bus: It’s a Losing Game,” Newsday (1940-1986), September 2, 1973, http://www.proquest.com.

[108] Robert M. Emery Long Island Rail Road Collection, Box 14, Special Collections, Stony Brook University Libraries, Long Island Rail Road Timetables, Effective May 25, 1970, by Long Island Rail Road (New York: Long Island Rail Road, 1970).

[109] “Promises? Tells Legislators of Four Point Long Island RR Improvement Program, Islip Bulletin, February 19, 1970, http://apa3.olivesoftware.com.

[110] “Suit on LIRR Station Fees,” Newsday (1940-1986), September 1, 1981, http://www.proquest.com.

[111] “Audits List LIRR Overcharge,” Newsday (1940-1986), March 18, 1982, http://www.proquest.com.

[112] Brand, “Train Joining the Forks is now a Missing Link.”

 

Next page: Discontinued Station Stops: The History of the Moriches and the Termination of Railroad Service

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